What about the 3%?

Our unemployment rate has dropped to 3.7%, and this is the lowest it has been since 1969. This is astonishing and something to be proud of; however, what about the 3.7% of individuals who are unemployed? This percentage is still incredibly significant considering our nation’s population. This means there are 12 million individuals who are still unemployed in the United States. We forget about these individuals who are isolated and unhappy because of their lack of employment. This 3.7% of people are looking at this number and thinking to themselves, “I am still here, and I am still unemployed.” We need to recognize that these individuals are struggling.


How do we better serve this 3.7% of individuals who are unemployed? One organization has the answer: do-over.me. Our organization serves the unemployed, underemployed, and unhappily employed. do-over.me aids this 3.7% to recognize their strengths, increase their self-awareness, and become happy with themselves. This 3.7% needs the aid of the other 96.3% of individuals who are employed and can support us in our efforts. With your donation, we will be able to reach out to this unemployed population and guide them towards a more promising future. With your help, we can make a difference in the lives of this 3.7%.

Adriana Jones is a graduate student at Adler University and currently interning at do.over.me. Her passions are psychology, creative writing, and her dogs.

More than 7 million jobs in the American economy remained vacant in September...

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“So why can’t I get a job?”

Let’s talk. I bet we can help you develop some strategies to move forward more successfully by differentiating yourself from the roughly 6 million workers seeking employment. The number of job openings dropped slightly from the previous month’s record of 7.3 million to 7.125 million, according to the Labor Department. Health care and social assistance industries witnessed the biggest increase in vacancies; professional and business services had the largest decline.